Shoot like a pro: 5 tips for getting better photos from phone

Here are five tips that are easy to follow and easier to apply. Just use them and you will see that the photos you are clicking with your phone are better and sharper.







Most of the phones nowadays come with fairly cool cameras. Even the relatively affordable smartphones like theand thepack in stellar cameras. Then there is the usage. Most of the photos clicked with smartphones are used on sites like Facebook, Instagram and Twitter, sites that mostly host low-resolution photos. Hence, even if your phone's camera can't match the performance of the DSLR camera, that is fine. You anyway don't need that kind of performance. However, what you do need is a little bit of extra care while clicking your photos.

Now, there are a number of things you can do to ensure that the photos that you take out of your phone are nice enough to get some cool likes on Instagram or Twitter. But here are five tips that are easy to follow and easier to apply. Just use them and you will see that the photos you are clicking with your phone are better and sharper.
Touch to focus

Phone cameras nowadays come with auto focus feature. This means as soon as a phone sees a face in the photo or an object that has enough contrast to standout in the frame, it will focus on that. this will ensure that your subject is right in the focus. But just like every other thing auto, the auto focus too may miss out the big picture. So, it is always prudent to tap on the area of the frame that you want sharpest in the photo. As soon as you touch an area in the frame, the camera will refocus. This trick works particularly great for macro photos.



Compose




Good photos have a sort of symmetry to them, some cohesiveness. So, take a look at the scene you are clicking and frame it in a way that makes it look good before you click the image. Now, composing is something that every photographer is going to do differently. This is the creative part in photography. But there are some simple rules that you can use. One of these rules is that you should get up-close, specially for macro photos or portraits. The idea is to fill the frame with subject. Second is avoid capturing too many elements. No clutter in images. Try to ensure that the subject or subjects in your photo stand out. Third is some degree of wholeness, symmetry. The image should feel complete, with no element cut abruptly, although, if you are following some geometrical lines, you can use them to fit in parts of the elements that are otherwise too big to come in the image (see the example above).
Use HDR

Although phone makers are still figuring out how to implement HDR mode properly, if you have a phone like the Nexus, which has an excellent HDR mode, you should use that. HDR mode often gives better contrast in images as well as may help you click usable photos in low light. Most of the high-end phones come with auto-HDR mode. Usually, you should leave it at default. But in case, the auto HDR mode is not there in your phone, toggle it manually every time you are shooting low light or high-contrast scenes (sunset for example).